Tag Archives: Barry

The Latest: Barry overwhelms sewage systems on Alabama coast

The Latest: Barry overwhelms sewage systems on Alabama coastAuthorities say rains from Barry overwhelmed sewer systems on Alabama’s coasts, causing more than 250,000 gallons (946,000 liters) in spills. The Alabama Department of Public Health says more than 180,000 gallons (680,000 liters) of sewage spilled in Baldwin County, located across Mobile Bay from the city of Mobile. An estimated 125,000 gallons (470,000 liters) went into D’Olive Creek in Daphne.



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Hurricane Barry photos show an otherworldly city, deep under water

Hurricane Barry photos show an otherworldly city, deep under waterFor the people of Mandeville, Louisiana, the effects of Hurricane Barry continue to be nothing short of otherworldly.On Saturday, the now tropical storm made landfall along the northern Gulf Coast as a Category 1 hurricane, leaving tens of thousands across Louisiana and Mississippi without power and otherwise cut off from drier parts of the region. Areas of widespread flooding varied in severity with some seeing accumulations of 20 inches, while others escaped with substantially lower-than-predicted rainfall. In Mandeville, just 132 miles from Morgan City where the storm first made contact with land, the shore of Lake Pontchartrain expanded onto city streets. On Lakeshore Drive, photographer Scott Olson captured dozens of residents, many of them couples and families, as they explored the transformed — and largely underwater — portion of their shared home.Image: scott olson/Getty ImagesThe road, officially closed off to the public since late Friday, became the central hub for photographic evidence of the storm's power, even as city officials warned people to stay away. "Officials would like to encourage pedestrians that this is not a sightseeing event," reported local radio station KPEL 96.5, adding, "Your safety is the number one priority."While an official depth of the flooding along Lakeshore Drive has not been reported, many images show adults up to their knees in water, in spite of numerous flood gates attempting to keep the lake at bay.Image: scott olson/Getty ImagesIn addition to the dangers of fast-moving currents and waterborne disease, Louisiana residents have been warned of the presence of water snakes and alligators within floodwaters. "If the area you live in has high water, watch out for snakes and other critters who are trying to escape the floodwaters as well," noted fire department officials in Slidell, another Louisiana city less than 30 miles from Mandeville. Still, per Olson's photos, it would appear many Mandeville folks tried to make the best of a bad situation. In a stint of waterlogged romance, numerous couples posed for the photographer among the aftermath for what Olson dubbed a post-hurricane "date night."Image: scott olson/Getty ImagesImage: scott olson/Getty ImagesOthers floated along in inner tubes and canoes, holding onto each other to maintain group formation.Image: scott olson/Getty ImagesImage: scott olson/Getty ImagesForegoing the impromptu swimming opportunity, some ogled the feat of Mother Nature from nearby structures, as waters began to recede and reveal what damage had been done to the community. Image: scott olson/Getty ImagesAtop the flood gates along Lake Pontchartrain, daredevils looked onto the source of the flooding.Thus far, no hurricane-related deaths have been reported in Mandeville, or elsewhere — although rescue efforts across the region remain underway with at least 12 people rescued by the U.S. Coast Guard and more than 120 cats and dogs rescued by The Humane Society.   Image: scott olson/Getty ImagesImage: scott olson/Getty ImagesSlowly but steadily the storm, now hovering near Shreveport, continues to make its way north. Although the cyclone is rapidly losing steam, its high water content indicates that rain will continue to befall the region even as those affected attempt recovery — with the possibility of tornadoes still close at hand. While New Orleans was spared levee-threatening flooding and many of the storm's effects have been less devastating than anticipated, Louisiana Governor John Bel Edwards is urging residents to keep their guards up."As Barry moves across the state, we still have several hours of rain, tornadoes, and severe weather ahead of us," the governor posted to Twitter. "Continue to monitor local media outlets for the latest weather information and important updates from local officials in your area. Be vigilant. Stay informed. Heed directions from officials." WATCH: This speedboat transforms itself into a submarine — Future Blink



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Louisiana officials warn of snakes and other creatures fighting to escape Hurricane Barry floodwaters

Louisiana officials warn of snakes and other creatures fighting to escape Hurricane Barry floodwatersHurricane Barry made landfall Saturday morning in Louisiana. It has since weakened back to a tropical storm, but heavy rains will continue.



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12 people were evacuated from a tiny island when storm surge from Tropical Storm Barry flooded the only road off the island

12 people were evacuated from a tiny island when storm surge from Tropical Storm Barry flooded the only road off the islandThe Coast Guard received a report of a dozen people in distress on the Isle de Jean Charles around 4:30 a.m. Saturday.



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Hurricane Barry is hitting Louisiana as the first hurricane of 2019. Here's why storms are getting stronger, slower, and wetter.

Hurricane Barry is hitting Louisiana as the first hurricane of 2019. Here's why storms are getting stronger, slower, and wetter.Hurricane Barry is moving over the Louisiana coast. Here's how climate change is making storms stronger, wetter, and more frequent.



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A car sank into the sand at an Alabama beach after its owner parked close to the shore ahead of Hurricane Barry

A car sank into the sand at an Alabama beach after its owner parked close to the shore ahead of Hurricane BarryThe owner of the car made the mistake of parking it close to the beach as then-Tropical Storm Barry caused tides to rise suddenly on Friday.



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Tropical Storm Barry is expected to make landfall tomorrow morning as a hurricane. Here's where the storm's path is heading.

Tropical Storm Barry is expected to make landfall tomorrow morning as a hurricane. Here's where the storm's path is heading.Tropical Storm Barry is headed toward Louisiana. It's expected to make landfall tomorrow morning, then head north toward Arkansas and beyond.



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Sprawling storm Barry intensifies into a hurricane

Sprawling storm Barry intensifies into a hurricaneUPDATE: July 13, 2019, 3:17 p.m. EDT: The National Hurricane Center advised that after making landfall in Louisiana, Barry weakened to a tropical storm. This doesn't change projections for pummeling rain and the likelihood of extreme flooding.  * * *The lopsided storm Barry is now a hurricane. The National Weather Service expects Hurricane Barry, packing 75 mph winds, to pummel portions of Louisiana, Mississippi, other nearby regions with extreme rain and flooding on Saturday and Sunday. Barry might not be a major hurricane, but it has capitalized on exceptionally warm ocean waters to load itself with moisture — which will soon douse the region."It's going to rain hard," Jeff Weber, a meteorologist with the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR), told Mashable as Barry picked up steam over the Gulf of Mexico."Rainfall is one of the most impactful effects of a tropical storm," National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) hurricane scientist Rosimar Rios-Berrios emphasized Friday evening, as Barry crept toward Louisiana."The rainfall does not depend on how strong the storm is," she added. Indeed, Hurricane Harvey — the largest rain event in U.S. history — did its most destruction when it was no longer a hurricane. "…the upgrade to a hurricane means little in terms of the overall impacts from Barry," the National Hurricane Center noted Saturday morning. > Barry is now a hurricane \- the first of the 2019 Atlantic hurricane season. On average, the first Atlantic hurricane forms on August 10. pic.twitter.com/rQ8gxIle74> > — Philip Klotzbach (@philklotzbach) July 13, 2019Portions of Louisiana and Mississippi are forecast to receive between 10 and 20 inches of rain. Some models show 18.5 inches in flood-prone Baton Rouge, Louisiana.  "A foot of rain in that area can create quite a problem," noted UCAR's Weber.Though rainfall would be imminent regardless, as of Friday afternoon it was still unclear if Barry would develop into a storm with hurricane force winds. The lopsided, unorganized storm system was getting hit by winds, known as wind shear, that made organizing into a more potent storm difficult, noted Rios-Berrios.But Barry overcame those challenges, and as a hurricane will bring surges of ocean water into coastal areas, threaten to overtop levees in the region, and almost certainly bring damaging or catastrophic flooding to certain areas over the next two days. > GOESEast watches as HurricaneBarry, now a Cat. 1 storm, creeps toward southern Louisiana. Dangerous storm surge, heavy rains and high winds are already impacting the north-central Gulf Coast. Latest updates: t.co/1L8q1zg4eW pic.twitter.com/wqI2lr8c83> > — NOAA Satellites (@NOAASatellites) July 13, 2019> VIDEO: Per Plaquemines Parish officials, water has overtopped the back levee at Myrtle Grove and Pointe Celeste. > > One homeowner nearby shared this 10AM view of the rising waters ahead of TropicalStormBarry. NBCNews pic.twitter.com/jNkzMXJrEV> > — Morgan Chesky (@BreakingChesky) July 13, 2019In much improved news for New Orleans, however, the National Weather Service projects that — even with Barry's wind-powered storm surge — the already-swollen Mississippi will reach 17 feet above sea level — as opposed to 20 feet expected a few days ago. Many of the city's levees protect the vibrant, historic city from up to 20 feet of flooding along the mighty river — so New Orleans may avoid a worst-case scenario this weekend. Still, coastal flooding and the overtopping of other levees has already begun, and the brunt of rain has yet to come. WATCH: Ever wonder how the universe might end?



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A dramatic satellite photo shows Hurricane Barry enveloping the Gulf of Mexico just before making landfall in Louisiana

A dramatic satellite photo shows Hurricane Barry enveloping the Gulf of Mexico just before making landfall in LouisianaSince the photo was taken around 10 AM Friday, the storm has since strengthened to a Category 1 hurricane.



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Tropical Storm Barry is expected to hit parts of Louisiana with more than 3 feet of storm surge and 20 inches of rain — here's what that much water looks like

Tropical Storm Barry is expected to hit parts of Louisiana with more than 3 feet of storm surge and 20 inches of rain — here's what that much water looks likeNew Orleans has already been drenched in nearly 9 inches of rain, prompting a flash-flood emergency declaration.



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