Tag Archives: archaeologists

Archaeologists discover Incan tomb in Peru

Archaeologists discover Incan tomb in PeruPeruvian archaeologists discovered an Incan tomb in the north of the country where an elite member of the pre-Columbian empire was buried, one of the investigators announced Friday. The discovery was made on the Mata Indio dig site in the northern Lambayeque region, archaeologist Luis Chero told state news agency Andina. Archaeologists believe the tomb belonged to a noble Inca based on the presence of “spondylus,” a type of sea shell always present in the graves of important figures from the Incan period, which lasted from the 12th to the 16th centuries.



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Archaeologists find new mass child sacrifice site in Peru

Archaeologists find new mass child sacrifice site in PeruA group of archaeologists has discovered the remains of more than 50 children who were ritually sacrificed by the pre-Columbian Chimu culture on the northern coast of what is now Peru. The site is located a close to another where evidence of the biggest-ever sacrifice of children was found, with more than 140 youngsters were slain. “So far we have found the remains of 56 children who were sacrificed by the Chimu culture,” archaeologist Gabriel Prieto told AFP.



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Serbian archaeologists find sarcophagus with two skeletons and jewellery in ancient city

Serbian archaeologists find sarcophagus with two skeletons and jewellery in ancient cityBy Aleksandar Vasovic KOSTOLAC, Serbia (Reuters) – Serbian archaeologists at the site of the ancient Roman city of Viminacium have found an intact sarcophagus with two skeletons bedecked with gold and silver adornments. Ilija Mikic, an anthropologist at the site, said the skeletons were of a tall, middle-aged man and a slim younger woman. In addition to three delicate glass perfume bottles, the woman had golden earrings, a necklace, a silver mirror and several expensive hair pins, while a silver belt buckle and remains of shoes were found lying around the man.



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Archaeologists Find 'Holy Grail of Shipwrecks' Carrying Stash Worth Up to $17 Billion

Archaeologists Find 'Holy Grail of Shipwrecks' Carrying Stash Worth Up to $  17 BillionIn 1708, the San José— a Spanish galleon ship carrying a stash of gold, silver and emeralds — sank during a fierce battle against the British in the Caribbean Sea. Now, after sitting at the bottom of the ocean for 310 years, the San José’s shipwreck has finally been officially identified, thanks to an analysis of the distinctive bronze cannons that sank with the ship.



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Archaeologists May Have Found the World's Largest Known Child Sacrifice Site in Peru

Archaeologists May Have Found the World's Largest Known Child Sacrifice Site in PeruArchaeologists in Peru have uncovered what could be the site of the largest known instance of child sacrifice in the Americas



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Archaeologists find ancient mass child sacrifice in Peru

Archaeologists find ancient mass child sacrifice in PeruLIMA, Peru (AP) — Archaeologists in northern Peru say they have found evidence of what could be the world's largest single case of child sacrifice.



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Archaeologists in Mexico Claim to Have Discovered the World's Longest Underwater Cave

Archaeologists in Mexico Claim to Have Discovered the World's Longest Underwater CaveThe discovery has revealed a combined cave about 216 miles long



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Archaeologists in Turkey believe they have discovered Santa Claus's tomb

Archaeologists in Turkey believe they have discovered Santa Claus's tombArchaeologists in Turkey have made a discovery which could settle a century-old debate … and disappoint millions of children around the world.  They have unearthed what they say is likely the tomb of the original Santa Claus, or Saint Nicholas, beneath an ancient church in Demre, southern Turkey. Demre, previously known as Myra, in Antalya province, is believed to be the birthplace of the 4th century bishop.  Cemil Karabayram, the head of Antalya’s Monument Authority, said the shrine was discovered during electronic surveys that showed gaps beneath the church. “We believe this shrine has not been damaged at all, but it is quite difficult to get to it as there are mosaics on the floor,” Mr Karabayram told the Turkish Hurriyet Daily News.  He said he is very optimistic about uncovering Saint Nicholas’s remains, but warned it will take some time to scale each tile one by one and remove them as a whole in a mold. Turkish experts claim that what was believed to be the original grave of Saint Nicholas (pictured) was in fact the grave of an anonymous priest.  Credit: Creative Commons “We have obtained very good results but the real work starts now,” he said, adding that the temple is almost fully intact but currently inaccessible due to the presence of stone reliefs that need to be preserved. “We will reach the ground and maybe we will find the untouched body of Saint Nicholas.”  Professor Sema Dogan, excavation leader, was stunned by the finding and believes the discovery could boost tourism to the area. At the time of his death in 343 A.D., Saint Nicholas was interred at the church in Demre, where he lay undisturbed until the 11th century.  Previously, the remains were believed to have then been smuggled to the Italian city of Bari by merchants in the year 1087. Christians visit the site of what was thought to be his final resting place in Bari's Basilica di San Nicola. However, Turkish experts are now claiming the wrong bones were removed and those taken abroad belong to another, local priest, rather than the legendary bishop. Christmas myth | Santa Claus is American Saint Nicholas of Myra was known for his generosity towards children. He had a reputation for secret gift-giving, such as putting coins in the shoes of those who left them out for him, a practice celebrated on his feast day, December 6. He was popularised in 16th century Europe as Father Christmas, who gave presents to young children. Dutch arrivals to the United States called their version of Saint Nicholas “Sinterklaas,” which later became Santa Claus. Saint Nicholas is depicted in modern images as a portly old man sporting a big white beard and spectacles.



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Egypt archaeologists unearth goldsmith's tomb near Luxor

Egypt archaeologists unearth goldsmith's tomb near LuxorEgyptian archaeologists have discovered a tomb of a prominent goldsmith who lived more than 3,000 years ago, unearthing statues, mummies and jewellery in the latest major find near the Nile city of Luxor. Egypt’s Minister of Antiquities Khaled Al-Anani said on Saturday the tomb dated back to Egypt’s 18th dynasty New Kingdom era — around 15th century B.C. “The work did not finish yet and we’re continuing and working to find more objects and more tombs,” he told Reuters at the site. Earlier this year, authorities announced they had discovered another New Kingdom tomb in Luxor belonging to a judge, and Swedish archaeologists discovered 12 ancient cemeteries near the southern city of Aswan that date back almost 3,500 years.



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Egypt archaeologists unearth 3,500-year-old tomb in Luxor

Egypt archaeologists unearth 3,500-year-old tomb in LuxorEgyptian archaeologists have uncovered the tomb of a goldsmith dedicated to the god Amun and the mummies of a woman and her two children, the antiquities ministry said on Saturday. The finds, dating back to the New Kingdom (16th to 11th centuries BC), were made in the Draa Abul Naga necropolis on the west bank of the Nile in Luxor, famed for its temples and burial grounds. The tomb of "Amun's Goldsmith, Amenemhat" contained a sculpture carved into a recess of him seated beside his wife, the ministry said. An Egyptian antiquities worker in the recently discovered tomb of Amenemhat Credit: Mohamed Abd El Ghany/Reuters A portrait of their son was painted between them. A burial shaft in the tomb led to a chamber where the archaeologists discovered mummies, funerary statues and masks, the ministry said. Another shaft led to a chamber where the team found the mummies of a woman and two children. An Egyptian archaeologist looks at a newly-uncovered sarcophagus in the Draa Abul Naga necropolis Credit: Egyptian Ministry of Antiquities via AFP  The woman appears to have died at the age of 50 and tests showed she had suffered from a bacterial bone disease, the ministry quoted bone specialist Sherine Ahmed Shawqi as saying. The team also discovered 150 small funerary statues carved in wood, clay and limestone. A skull and a foot are seen in the recently discovered tomb of Amenemhat Credit: Mohamed Abd El Ghany/Reuters The tomb, located on the west bank of the river Nile in a cemetery for noblemen and top officials, is a relatively modest discovery, but one that authorities has announced with a great deal of fanfare in a bid to boost the country's slowly recovering tourism industry. "We want tomorrow's newspapers to speak about Egypt and make people want to come to Egypt," antiquities minister Khaled el-Anani told reporters. Egyptian archaeologist restoring a wooden sarcophagus at a newly-uncovered ancient tomb for a goldsmith in Luxor Credit: KHALED DESOUKI/AFP/Getty Images The tomb was discovered by Egyptian archeologists, something that a senior official at the antiquities ministry hailed as evidence of their growing professionalism and expertise. "We used to escort foreign archeologists as observers, but that's now in the past. We are the leaders now," said Mustafa Waziri, Luxor's chief archaeologist. 



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