Tag Archives: Analysts

A new, ultra-low-cost Indian airline just placed a $9 billion order with Boeing, and analysts say it could lift up the country’s entire aviation segment


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The GOP Senate is primed to get even Trumpier, political analysts say


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Kushner-brokered deal between Saudi Arabia, Qatar gets tepid reviews from analysts


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Fox News Legal Analysts: GOP Impeachment Witness Is ‘Simply Wrong’

Fox News Legal Analysts: GOP Impeachment Witness Is ‘Simply Wrong’During a break in Wednesday’s House Judiciary impeachment hearing, two Fox News analysts who have largely been on opposite sides of the impeachment fence found themselves in agreement on one thing: Republican witness Jonathan Turley was “simply wrong” to argue that Congress was abusing its power by impeaching the president.In his opening statement and throughout his early testimony, Turley—a George Washington University law professor—pointed the finger at House Democrats and attempted to turn the tables on their allegations President Donald Trump abused his power and obstructed justice.“Then you have an obstruction case, because a court issues an order, and unless they stay that order by a higher court, you have obstruction,” Turley declared. “But I can’t emphasize this enough and I’ll say it just one more time, if you impeach a president, if you make a high crime and misdemeanor out of going to the courts, it is an abuse of power. It’s your abuse of power. You’re doing precisely what you’re criticizing the president for doing.”Fox News senior judicial analyst Judge Andrew Napolitano, who has repeatedly insisted that Trump committed impeachable offenses, pushed back on Turley’s analysis.“Where I disagree with my dear friend—I’ve worked with him and testified alongside him—Jon Turley on the significance of obstruction of justice, he is forgetting that the House has the sole—S-O-L-E—power of impeachment,” Napolitano proclaimed. “It does not need to go to a court for approval.”“It doesn’t need to go to court to get the subpoenas enforced,” he added. “When the president receives a subpoena, or in this case Mick Mulvaney, Mike Pompeo receive a subpoena, and they throw it in a drawer. They do not comply or challenge because the president told them to; that is the act of obstruction.”Fox News contributor Andy McCarthy, a former U.S attorney who has been a vocal critic of impeachment, meanwhile, backed up Napolitano’s remarks.“I happen to agree with the judge,” McCarthy noted. “I do not think that to the extent that Jon Turley is taking the position that you either have to or should go to the court if you are Congress to enforce your subpoenas, I think that is simply wrong.”“I don’t think the framers would have thought that the Article I branch needed the assistance of the Article III branch to impeach an officer of the Article II branch,” the National Review columnist continued. “I just don’t think that it’s conceivable.”Read more at The Daily Beast.Got a tip? Send it to The Daily Beast hereGet our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.



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Teachers strike taught Chicago's new mayor tough lessons -analysts

Teachers strike taught Chicago's new mayor tough lessons -analystsChicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot made strategic errors in the first major fight of her tenure, an 11-day teachers’ strike, but may have learned lessons that will prove useful as she confronts immense city budget challenges, political observers said. Lightfoot, 57, was elected in convincing fashion to become Chicago’s first black woman mayor in April, when she vaulted to victory on promises to dismantle the city’s corrupt political machine and reform the city’s school district.



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Trump’s asylum deal with Guatemala threatens to plunge country into political crisis, analysts warn

Trump’s asylum deal with Guatemala threatens to plunge country into political crisis, analysts warnIn pressuring Guatemala to accept a deal to absorb vast numbers of asylum-seekers, the Trump administration has embarked on a dramatic and risky strategy to slash the number of Central Americans flooding the US-Mexico border.The accord – which was negotiated in secret and signed at the White House on Friday – could plunge Guatemala’s young democracy into a constitutional crisis, analysts warn.It could also saddle one of the hemisphere’s poorest countries with tens of thousands of Salvadoran and Honduran migrants who would be barred from making their claims in the United States.The agreement is one of the boldest steps yet taken by Donald Trump to stanch the flow of migrants to the US border.It aims to close off the US asylum system to the migrants who have crossed through Guatemala en route to the United States. They would instead have to seek protection in Guatemala.But the agreement is built on a fragile political and legal base.Guatemala’s constitutional court ruled earlier this month that President Jimmy Morales needed approval from the Guatemalan Congress to sign the accord – something he has not received.The Guatemalan president has sharply criticised the court decision, saying on Friday that “as far as we understand, this doesn’t have to go before Congress”.Some analysts said Mr Morales could get around the ruling with his argument that the deal is simply a cooperation agreement, not a treaty. But others note Mr Morales has at times simply shrugged off court rulings he dislikes.“This leaves a legacy we won’t be able to recover from, that the country’s constitution can be flagrantly violated without any kind of reaction or penalty,” said Renzo Rosal, an independent political consultant.The agreement is also likely to be challenged in US courts by opponents who say that Guatemala does not qualify as a “safe” country, because of high levels of violence.Whatever happens with the courts, the agreement has little political support in Guatemala.Mr Morales, who finishes his four-year term in January, is highly unpopular.Among the top Twitter hashtags in Guatemala in recent days has been Jimmyvendepatrias – Jimmy the sellout – as a dig at the country’s leader.Guatemalans were startled by a widely published photo showing their government minister, Enrique Degenhart, signing the agreement as Mr Trump loomed over his shoulder, an image suggesting the Central American country’s submission.On Saturday, hundreds of people demonstrated in front of the presidential palace in Guatemala City to protest the agreement, the Associated Press reported. The protesters carried Guatemalan flags and called for Mr Morales’ resignation.Guatemalan analysts have suggested Mr Morales made the deal with Mr Trump in hopes of winning support from the US government.Mr Morales faces allegations of financial crimes related to his 2015 electoral campaign but has been shielded by presidential immunity, which he loses in January. He says he is innocent.Mr Morales said the agreement would help Guatemala by “putting us in a privileged position” with the country’s top trading partner and most important ally.Guatemala holds a run-off presidential election on 11 August, and both candidates have criticised Mr Morales’ negotiation of such a broad agreement in secret.The accord “is unlikely to be sustainable”, Stephen McFarland, a former US ambassador to Guatemala, wrote in a tweet on the eve of the agreement’s unveiling.“A bitter US ‘win’ would put at risk US goals in democracy and law enforcement with the current and next governments.”While the next Guatemalan government could cancel the agreement, it would face intense pressure from the Trump administration to not do so.Mr Morales’ government signed the pact after Mr Trump threatened severe penalties on Guatemala – tariffs, a travel ban or taxes on the billions of dollars in remittances sent home by migrants in the United States.Kevin McAleenan, the acting Homeland Security secretary, said the administration plans to start the “safe third country” programme with Guatemala in August.Human rights groups, Democratic lawmakers and immigration experts have said Guatemala is too poor and underdeveloped to handle a flood of asylum applicants.Last year, Salvadoran and Honduran migrants filed nearly 58,000 applications for asylum in the United States. That same year, Guatemala received just 259 asylum applications overall.Guatemala is the number one source of irregular migration to the United States, with citizens fleeing poverty, violence, low coffee prices and drought.Eric Schwartz, head of Refugees International and a former top refugee official at the US State Department, said in a statement that the agreement “would represent a grotesque violation of both US law and human decency” and “would put at risk the lives of thousands of Central Americans”.Sonia Lucia Valenzuela, a constitutional law expert in Guatemala, said the Constitutional Court ruling was clear in instructing Mr Morales to send the agreement to Congress but that political pressures could determine what happens next.The migration agreement has been strongly supported by Guatemala’s influential business groups, who had feared US tariffs. But many current and former politicians oppose it.“If the opposition to this accord continues, that’s a sign this will escalate,” she said.Washington Post



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Sanctions delay plans for N. Korean beach resort: analysts

Sanctions delay plans for N. Korean beach resort: analystsNorth Korea has again pushed back the construction end-date of a massive beach resort — a move analysts say shows the regime is struggling from international sanctions imposed over its nuclear weapons programmes. The eastern seaside strip, known as the Wonsan-Kalma Coastal Tourist Area, is intended as a centrepiece of the isolated country’s nascent tourism industry as Pyongyang seeks to develop its economy despite the tough economic measures. The site’s construction has been closely overseen by leader Kim Jong Un, and was initially scheduled to open this April, to mark the birthday anniversary of the country’s founder Kim Il Sung.



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Brazil's Bolsonaro taking a risk on Venezuela: analysts

Brazil's Bolsonaro taking a risk on Venezuela: analystsBy siding with the United States in recognizing Juan Guaido as Venezuela’s interim president and dismissing Nicolas Maduro as an illegitimate “dictator,” Brazilian far-right leader Jair Bolsonaro is making a risky bet, analysts and former diplomats say. Firstly, he is breaking with Brazil’s tradition of trying to maintain cordial relations with governments of all stripes. Secondly, he is thrusting Brazil into a showdown that, in the words of Rubens Ricupero, a former Brazilian ambassador to the US speaking to the newspaper O Globo, “could have unpredictable consequences for the region” if not quickly resolved.



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Global pressure vital for Yemen accord: analysts

Global pressure vital for Yemen accord: analystsA breakthrough accord between Yemen’s warring sides is the most significant step towards ending the country’s devastating conflict, but analysts warn its success depends on further international pressure. The United Nations on Thursday brokered a truce between Yemen’s government, supported by a Saudi-led military coalition, and Iran-backed Huthi rebels. While the agreement signed in Sweden was welcomed by all involved, analysts say it is fraught with risks and needs to be reinforced by the international community.



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Qatar may benefit from Khashoggi fallout: analysts

Qatar may benefit from Khashoggi fallout: analystsGlobal diplomatic fallout from the murder of journalist Jamal Khashoggi in Saudi Arabia’s Istanbul consulate may help Qatar in its political stand-off with the kingdom, experts said. The backlash may force Riyadh to ease sweeping sanctions imposed on Doha since the dispute erupted between the former Gulf allies in June 2017. The killing of Khashoggi — who was critical of the Saudi government and its blockade of Qatar — may convince sceptics that Doha’s claims of Saudi “aggression” were justified, according to analysts.



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