Tag Archives: American

A bride was angry her African American friend didn't want to attend her wedding at a plantation, and people think she's in the wrong

A bride was angry her African American friend didn't want to attend her wedding at a plantation, and people think she's in the wrongA woman was criticized for how she reacted to her bridesmaid's decision to drop out of her plantation wedding, as she wrote in a since-deleted Reddit post.



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American forces kill jihadi leader in Syria with precision 'Ninja' missile that chops up targets with blades

American forces kill jihadi leader in Syria with precision 'Ninja' missile that chops up targets with bladesU.S. forces are thought to have killed a senior jihadi leader in northern Syria using a rarely deployed “Ninja” missile, which attacks targets with precision swordlike blades.



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American lawyers who have had abortions file Supreme Court brief

American lawyers who have had abortions file Supreme Court briefMore than 360 American women who have had abortions and work in the legal profession, including several high-profile attorneys, have filed a brief with the Supreme Court ahead of a closely watched abortion case.



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American flight bound for Miami diverted after woman fakes medical condition, police say

American flight bound for Miami diverted after woman fakes medical condition, police sayAn American Airlines flight had to be diverted on Friday after a passenger attempted to fake a medical condition to get a bigger seat on the flight.



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4 Decades of Inequality Drive American Cities Apart

4 Decades of Inequality Drive American Cities ApartIn 1980, highly paid workers in Binghamton, New York, earned about 4 1/2 times what low-wage workers there did. The gap between them, in a region full of IBM executives and manufacturing jobs, was about the same as the gap between the workers near the top and the bottom in metro New York City.Since then, the two regions have diverged. IBM shed jobs in Binghamton. Other manufacturing disappeared, too. High-paying work in the new knowledge economy concentrated in New York City, and so did well-educated workers. As a result, by one measure, wage inequality today is much higher in New York City than it is in Binghamton.What has happened over the last four decades is only partly a story of New York City's rise as a global hub and Binghamton's struggles. Economic inequality has been rising everywhere in the United States. But it has been rising much more in the booming places that promise hefty incomes to engineers, lawyers and innovators. And those places today are also the largest metros in the country: New York, Los Angeles, San Francisco, San Jose, Houston, Washington.Data from a recent analysis by Jaison Abel and Richard Deitz of the Federal Reserve Bank of New York captures several dynamics that have remade the U.S. economy since 1980. Thriving and stagnant places are pulling apart from each other. And within the most prosperous regions, inequality is widening to new extremes. That this inequality now so clearly correlates with city size — the largest metros are the most unequal — also shows how changes in the economy are both rewarding and rattling what we have come to think of as "superstar cities."In these places, inequality and economic growth now go hand in hand.Back in 1980, Binghamton's wage inequality made the region among the most unequal in the country, according to the Fed analysis. It ranked 20th of 195 metros as measured by comparing the wages of workers at the 90th percentile with those at the 10th percentile of the local wage distribution, a measure that captures the breadth of disparities in the local economy without focusing solely on the very top. In 1980, New York City was slightly less unequal, ranking 44th by this measure.Forty years ago, none of the country's 10 largest metros were among the 20 most unequal. By 2015, San Francisco, New York, Houston, Los Angeles, Dallas and Washington had jumped onto that list, pulled there by the skyrocketing wages of high-skilled workers. Binghamton over the same period had become one of the least unequal metros, in part because many IBM executives and well-paid manufacturing workers had vanished from its economy.In effect, something we often think of as undesirable (high inequality) has been a signal of something positive in big cities (a strong economy). And in Binghamton, relatively low inequality has been a signal of a weak economy. (The Fairfield-Bridgeport, Connecticut, metro stands out in either era because the deep poverty of its urban core is surrounded by particularly rich suburbs.)These patterns are hard to reconcile with appeals today for reducing inequality, both within big cities and across the country. What are Americans supposed to make of the fact that more high-paying jobs by definition widen inequality? Should New Yorkers be OK with growing inequality in New York if it is driven by rising wages for high-skilled workers, and not falling wages for low-skilled ones?"That's more of a political question," said Nathaniel Baum-Snow, an economist at the University of Toronto. "That's a question of what we decide our values should be as a society."Tom VanHeuvelen, a sociologist at the University of Minnesota who has also researched these patterns, said: "It seems obvious to me that it doesn't need to be the way that it is right now. This isn't the only inevitable outcome we have when we think about the relationship between cities, affluence and inequality."Economists say that the same forces that are driving economic growth in big cities are also responsible for inequality. And those forces have accumulated and reinforced each other since 1980.High-skilled workers have been in increasing demand and increasingly rewarded. In New York, the real wages for workers at the 10th percentile grew by about 15% between 1980 and 2015, according to the Fed researchers. For the median worker, they grew by about 40%. For workers at the 90th percentile, they nearly doubled.That is partly because when highly skilled workers and their firms cluster in the same place today, they are all more productive, research shows. And in major cities, they are also tied directly into the global economy."If you're someone who has skills for the new economy, your skills turn out to be more valuable in bigger cities, in a way that wasn't true 30 to 40 years ago," Baum-Snow said.It is no surprise, then, that high-skilled workers have been sorting into big, prosperous cities, compounding the advantages of these places (and draining less prosperous places of these workers).At the same time, automation, globalization and the decline of manufacturing have decimated well-paying jobs that once required no more than a high school diploma. That has hollowed out both the middle class in big cities and the economic engine in smaller cities. The result is that changes in the economy have disproportionately rewarded some places and harmed others, pushing their trajectories apart.Add one more dynamic to all of this: Inequality has been rising nationally since the 1980s. But because the Bay Area and New York regions already had more than their fair share of one-percenters (or 10 percenters) in 1980, the national growth in income inequality has been magnified in those places."We've had this pulling apart of the overall income distribution," said Robert Manduca, a doctoral student in sociology and social policy at Harvard University who has found that about half of the economic divergence between different parts of the country is explained by trends in national inequality. "That overall pulling apart has had very different effects in different places, based on which kinds of people were already living in those places."Manduca says national policies like reinvigorating antitrust laws would be most effective at reducing inequality (the consolidation of many industries has meant, among other things, that smaller cities that once had company headquarters have lost those jobs, sometimes to big cities).It is hard to imagine local officials combating all these forces. Increases to the minimum wage are likely to be swamped — at least in this measure — by the gains of workers at the top. Policies that tax high earners more to fund housing or education for the poor would redistribute some of the uneven gains of the modern economy. But they would not alter the fact that this economy values an engineer so much more than a line cook."If you brought the bottom up, it would be a better world," said Richard Florida, a professor at the University of Toronto who has written extensively about these trends. "But you'd still have a big rise in wage inequality."This article originally appeared in The New York Times.(C) 2019 The New York Times Company



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Career Diplomats Pushed Back on Trump’s Attempt to End ‘Temporary Protected Status’ for Central American Migrants

Career Diplomats Pushed Back on Trump’s Attempt to End ‘Temporary Protected Status’ for Central American MigrantsThe early Trump administration batted down warnings from career U.S. diplomats who warned that some hardline immigration policies could have dangerous national security consequences, according to diplomatic cables released by Senate Democrats Thursday.Some diplomats, including those at the U.S. Embassies in El Salvador, Honduras and Haiti, were concerned that the administration's plan to end the Temporary Protected Status (TPS) program for undocumented immigrants would cause a spike in transnational crime and illegal immigration, and would damage the relationship between the U.S. and Latin America and the Caribbean.“A sudden termination of TPS for El Salvador would undermine additional cooperation to tackle the root causes of illegal migration and overwhelm the country’s ability to absorb the refugees,” then-U.S. Ambassador Jean Elizabeth Manes wrote to Washington, D.C. in July, 2017.Under Secretary of State for Political Affairs Thomas Shannon objected even more strenuously to ending the program for the three countries.“It is our purpose to provide the best possible foreign policy and diplomatic advice,” Shannon wrote in a letter to then-Secretary of State Rex Tillerson. “From my point of view that advice is obvious: extend TPS for the countries indicated.”Some 400,000 migrants from Central America and Haiti have been granted temporary residence and working privileges in the U.S. The program's protections were originally granted to refugees fleeing wars or natural disasters, including Hurricane Mitch in Honduras in 1999 and the earthquakes that ravaged El Salvador and Haiti in 2001 and 2010.Since then, however, the program has received extensions under several administrations as U.S. leadership weighed the negative economic and political consequences of returning hundreds of thousands of refugees to countries ill-prepared to reabsorb them.The administration recently abandoned its attempts to shutter the program following a protracted legal battle. Last month, acting Homeland Security Secretary Kevin McAleenan and El Salvador’s foreign minister signed an agreement granting a one year reprieve to about 200,000 Salvadorans who reside in the U.S. under the program.As part of the agreement, El Salvador has agreed to work with U.S. immigration authorities to ramp up its efforts to stanch the flow of migrants attempting to leave the violence-stricken country to cross the U.S. southern border illegally.



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Killed American family may have been 'bait' in Mexican cartel fight: relatives

Killed American family may have been 'bait' in Mexican cartel fight: relativesThe nine American women and children killed in northern Mexico were victims of a territorial dispute between an arm of the Sinaloa Cartel and a rival gang, officials said on Wednesday, and may have been used to lure one side into a firefight. Members of breakaway Mormon communities that settled in Mexico decades ago, the three families were ambushed as they drove along a dirt track in Sonora state, leading to U.S. President Donald Trump urging Mexico and the United States to "wage war' together on the drug cartels. Accounts emerging of Monday morning's slayings detailed the heroism of a surviving boy who walked for miles to get help for his siblings, and heavy gun battles in the remote hill area that lasted for hours into the night after the attack.



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A suspect was arrested in the murder of 9 American Mormons in Mexico, and police think it might be a case of mistaken identity

A suspect was arrested in the murder of 9 American Mormons in Mexico, and police think it might be a case of mistaken identityAuthorities announced Wednesday that it had detained an individual who was holding two hostages in Agua Prieta, a town in the Mexican state of Sonora.



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At least nine American Mormon community members killed in Mexico

At least nine American Mormon community members killed in MexicoAt least three women and six children from an American Mormon community in northern Mexico have been killed in an ambush in an area notorious for drug traffickers and bandits, a relative said. The government deployed the army to fight drug trafficking in 2006, but experts blame the so-called "drug war" for the spiraling violence between fragmented cartels and the military, which has lead to more than 250,000 murders. Julian Lebaron said his cousin was traveling with her four children to the airport when she was attacked and shot in Rancho de la Mora, an area near the US border.



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US issues $20 million reward for American missing in Iran

US issues $  20 million reward for American missing in IranThe Trump administration on Monday offered a reward of up to $ 20 million for information about Robert Levinson, a former FBI agent who disappeared in Iran in 2007, and imposed new sanctions on leading Iranian officials as relations deteriorated further on the 40th anniversary of the U.S. Embassy takeover. The reward for help solving the Levinson disappearance and the sanctions also come as Iran said it was doubling the number of advanced centrifuges it operates to produce nuclear fuel, trimming the time experts believe that the Islamic Republic would need to have enough material to build a nuclear weapon. The State Department claims Levinson was taken hostage in Iran with the involvement of the Iranian regime.



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