Tag Archives: admits

Russia’s Military Admits It Needs Western Technology

Russia’s Military Admits It Needs Western TechnologyWhen Western nations imposed economic sanctions after Russia’s annexation of Crimea in 2014, Moscow had an answer: Russia would substitute domestic products for foreign imports.But Russia’s defense industry is still using imported parts despite the government ban, according to Russia’s top prosecutor.“Import substitution in the defense industry remains a problem," warned Prosecutor-General Yuri Chaika. "Instances of non-compliance with the ban to purchase foreign equipment whose counterparts are manufactured in Russia continue to be revealed."“In the framework of import substitution in the defense industry, it is vital to ensure compliance with the deadlines for replacing components,” said First Deputy Prosecutor General Alexander Buksman. “Raw and [other] materials produced by NATO countries and Ukraine, used to manufacture machines, arms, military and special equipment, prevent non-compliance with the ban on the budget-funded purchase of foreign equipment, analogues of which are produced in Russia.”Unfortunately, the problem is that equivalents to Western goods are often not produced in Russia. “Russia produces few high value goods that can compete with imports,” noted a 2017 Moscow Times article. “Thanks to oil inflating the value of the ruble it has always been cheaper and easier to import finished goods than go through the process of investing money into expensive production and development lines that produce goods that are, at the end of the day, inferior to the imports.”



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Police officer accuses McDonald's workers of taking bite out of sandwich then admits he ‘forgot he ate it’

Police officer accuses McDonald's workers of taking bite out of sandwich then admits he ‘forgot he ate it’A police officer wrongly accused McDonald’s workers of taking a bite out of his sandwich after he forgot he did it himself.The officer, known only as “DJ”, ordered a McChicken before starting work at Marion County Jail in Indianapolis and put it in a fridge for safekeeping during his shift.When he opened it up seven hours later he discovered the missing chunk and became convinced he had been targeted by the restaurant staff because of his job.“I know I didn’t eat it,” he told the WTHR local TV station. “No one else was around.“I said, ‘You know what? I am going to the McDonald’s to see if they can get that taken care of.’“I just wanted to find out who the person was and they deal with that person in an appropriate way.”Managers at the branch on Morris Street checked the schedule to see who was preparing the food when he placed his order but found no evidence to back up the officer’s claims.The truth was revealed more than a week later when Marion County Sheriff’s Office announced that the mystery biter was its own officer, “DJ”.“The investigation has determined that McDonald’s restaurant staff in no way tampered with the employee’s food,” the agency said in a statement on Friday.“The employee took a bite out of the sandwich upon starting his shift at the Marion County Jail, then placed it in the refrigerator in a break room.“He returned nearly seven hours later having forgotten that he had previously bitten the sandwich.“He wrongly concluded that a McDonald’s restaurant employee had tampered with his food because he is a law enforcement officer.” The officer formally apologised to McDonald’s for his error.



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Romania suspect admits murdering two teenage girls

Romania suspect admits murdering two teenage girlsA man in Romania has admitted to killing two teenage girls including a 15-year-old whose disappearance this week shook the country and claimed the scalp of the police chief, the suspect’s lawyer said Sunday. The suspect, named as 65-year-old Gheorghe Dinca, “has confessed his crimes”, lawyer Alexandru Bogdan was quoted as saying by Agerpres news agency. After initially refusing to answer any questions, Dinca eventually caved and admitted to the murders of Alexandra who vanished on Wednesday and 19-year-old Luiza, missing since April.



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Romania suspect admits murdering two teenage girls

Romania suspect admits murdering two teenage girlsA man in Romania has admitted to killing two teenage girls including a 15-year-old whose disappearance this week shook the country and claimed the scalp of the police chief, the suspect’s lawyer said Sunday. The suspect, named as 65-year-old Gheorghe Dinca, “has confessed his crimes”, lawyer Alexandru Bogdan was quoted as saying by Agerpres news agency. After initially refusing to answer any questions, Dinca eventually caved and admitted to the murders of Alexandra who vanished on Wednesday and 19-year-old Luiza, missing since April.



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Trump admits he allowed Devin Nunes access to classified intelligence documents about Russia investigation

Trump admits he allowed Devin Nunes access to classified intelligence documents about Russia investigationDonald Trump has given the US attorney general permission to share classified information about the Russia investigation with Devin Nunes, the Republican House Intelligence Committee ranking member who has called for Justice Department and FBI officials to be jailed over the probe.The US president said he had given William Barr “a total release” of documents relating to the investigation into Moscow’s interference in the 2016 election, and had also “given him authorisation to release it to whoever he wants”.“He’s got everything; everything he needs, he’s got,” he told Sean Hannity in an interview on Fox News on Thursday night.Mr Trump added: “He’s the attorney general of the United States, he’s has got a lot of very good people under him that I guess are involved and I gave them a total release. So, all of it’s been released and he has all of it.“I’ve also given him authorisation to release it to whoever he wants, whether it’s his people or frankly perhaps people like Devin Nunes, who is a star.”Mr Nunes, the former chair of the House Intelligence Committee, this week portrayed allegations that Mr Trump’s presidential campaign team colluded with Russia as a “hoax” comparable to “the Loch Ness monster”.Earlier this month, he described officials who triggered Robert Mueller’s Russia investigation as “a bunch of dirty cops”.“Some of them better go to jail, or we're going to go down in a spiral in this country because you will not have a Republican that will trust the FBI or the Department of Justice for generations to come,” he told Fox News presenter Bill Hemmer.Mr Mueller, giving testimony on Capitol Hill on Wednesday, rejected Mr Trump's claims to have been been exonerated by the special counsel's report."That is not what the report said. The president was not exculpated for the acts that he allegedly committed," he told congress.Mr Nunes has repeatedly been accused of attempting to undermine investigations into the Russia allegations.In 2017, he was forced to temporarily recuse himself from the House Intelligence Committee’s probe while the Office of Congressional Ethics investigated his disclosure of intelligence files which he claimed showed Mr Trump’s transition team had been caught up in surveillance.He reportedly received the files from White House officials and was criticised by both Democrats and Republicans for revealing information from classified documents.Mr Nunes was later cleared by the ethics watchdog, but the release of the declassified memo last year showed key elements of his claims of FBI misconduct had been false or misleading.



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ICE raids: Top immigration official admits he ‘does not know details’ of controversial arrests

ICE raids: Top immigration official admits he ‘does not know details’ of controversial arrestsThe acting director of US Citizenship and Immigration Services has said he does not have details about the ICE raids targeting undocumented immigrants, even though he has spoken about the operation in recent days.Ken Cuccinelli said during a CNN appearance on Monday he did “not have operational details”, including how many arrests were made during the operation that began on Sunday.Last week, Mr Cuccinelli discussed the operation and said there were approximately one million people in the US with removal orders.“I told you, I don't have details about any arrests that have taken place so far with respect to that operation,” Mr Cuccinelli said, explaining his lack of knowledge about specifics by saying “operational details are kept contained within the agency”.The raids were expected in Atlanta, Baltimore, Chicago, Denver, Houston, Los Angeles, Miami, New York and San Francisco.But, there were no reports of the raids in several cities, according to immigrant advocacy groups that are monitoring the situation.Mr Cucinelli’s agency is in charge of legal immigration, and it is left to Immigration and Customs Enforcement to detain undocumented immigrants for deportation.The US has conducted raids previously, including raids on workplaces where undocumented immigrants have allegedly been hired.Donald Trump's administration has overseen a spike in the number of those kinds of raids, compared to during the Obama administration.



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US-made missiles found at base used by Libyan rebels to attack Tripoli are ours, France admits

US-made missiles found at base used by Libyan rebels to attack Tripoli are ours, France admitsFrance on Wednesday admitted that it is the owner of American-made anti-tank missiles found at a rebel military base in Libya, raising awkward questions about European involvement in the civil war. France's Army Ministry said the four Javelin missiles discovered at a base used by General Khalifa Haftar's Libyan National Army were intended for "self-protection of a French military unit deployed to carry out intelligence and counter-terrorism operations." "Damaged and unusable, the armaments were being temporarily stocked at a depot ahead of their destruction," it said in a statement on Wednesday.  It said the weapons, found in the mountains south of Tripoli by forces loyal to the UN-backed government, were never intended for sale or transfer to any party to Libya's conflict. The missiles were discovered on a rebel base in Gharyan when UN-recognised government forces recaptured the city Credit: Anadolu Agency  The statement did not explain how many French soldiers are in the country or why they were operating in close proximity to Gheryan, the LNA's main headquarters for its controversial assault on Tripoli. The discovery of javelin missiles at Gheryan was first reported by the New York Times. Chinese-made shells with United Arab Emirates markings were also discovered.  At least 1,000 people have been killed and tens of thousands displaced since Gen Haftar launched his assault on Tripoli in a bid to overthrow the UN-backed government of national accord in April.  France, like all permanent members of the UN Security Council, officially recognises the UN-backed Government of National Accord (GNA).  But Fayez Al-Sarraj, the prime minister of the GNA, has publicly protested French support for Gen Haftar since the battle began.  Some observers have also accused Paris of providing the general with diplomatic cover by watering down European Union statements about his attack on Tripoli.  Jalel Harouchi, a Libya analyst at the Clingedael Institute, said the discovery made it "impossible for Paris to credibly deny its deep preference" for Gen Haftar's faction in the civil war.  "For several years now, it has sought to prop up Marshal Haftar, help him defeat his opponents and take power in Libya," he said. "In any event, other foreign states, such as the UAE, violate the Libya arms embargo much more egregiously than France does." Gen Haftar, who heads a rival administration in the east of the country, has sought to portray himself as a potential secular strongman able to deal robustly with the threat of Islamist extremism in Libya. He is believed to enjoy backing from Egypt, the United Arab Emirates, and Saudi Arabia, and has also visited both Paris and Moscow to seek support.  He has courted the United States, which provided him with asylum after he fell out with Muammar Gadaffi in the 1980s.  Last week the United States blocked a British-drafted United Nations Security Council resolution that would have condemned an LNA airstrike on a migrant holding centre that killed at least 40 people.  The FGM 148 Javelin is a US-manufactured shoulder-launched missile designed to destroy modern tanks by striking them from above, where their armour is thinnest. They cost about £135,000 a piece.



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Rep. Omar admits she may have embellished dramatic story she told to high school students

Rep. Omar admits she may have embellished dramatic story she told to high school studentsMinnesota Democrat says she may have flubbed some facts in story meant to showcase racial injustice; reaction from Fox News contributor Deroy Murdock.



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Vladimir Putin finally admits fire-hit Russian submarine was nuclear powered

Vladimir Putin finally admits fire-hit Russian submarine was nuclear poweredVladimir Putin has admitted that the fire that killed 14 sailors on Monday happened on a nuclear submarine, although the defence ministry said the reactor was not damaged. Ministry head Sergei Shoigu met with Mr Putin on Thursday upon his return from the Arctic naval town of Severomorsk, where the stricken submersible was taken. During their conversation, Mr Putin asked him about the nuclear power unit on board, according to a Kremlin readout. Moscow had not previously confirmed the presence of a reactor and still has not said what kind of submarine was involved, arguing that these are state secrets. Mr Shoigu told Mr Putin that "the nuclear power unit has been sealed off and all personnel have been removed". He also said the cause of the disaster was a "fire in the battery compartment which then spread". The blaze happened on Monday but was only announced the next day by Russian authorities, who have refused to give many details about the incident. Russia rescue personnel return from a dive in a mini submarine to the Kursk on the sea bed Credit: RU-RTR Russian Television via AP It is believed that the fire occurred on an AS-31 deep-water research submarine in the Barents Sea. Nicknamed "Losharik" after a Soviet cartoon horse, it is operated by a navy division responsible for reconnaissance and intelligence gathering and can reportedly dive to depths of 10,000 feet. The submarine is reportedly able to cut underwater cables that carry much of the world's internet traffic. All 14 of the sailors who died were officers, leading to speculation that it was on a top-secret mission. The defence ministry said they were performing "bathymetric measurements" of the ocean floor. One sailor put a civilian in a compartment and shut the hatch to return to fighting the blaze, it said.  Arctic neighbour Norway said it had been informed of a gas explosion on the submarine, but the Russian defence ministry denied this. Norwegian authorities said they had not detected abnormal levels of radiation in the Barents Sea.



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Pentagon Admits Plan to Launch 1,300 Satellites Might Not Prevent Chinese or Russian Attacks

Pentagon Admits Plan to Launch 1,300 Satellites Might Not Prevent Chinese or Russian AttacksPhoto Illustration by Kelly Caminero/The Daily Beast/GettyA new Pentagon space agency wants to launch nearly 1,300 small satellites and, in the process, totally reinvent the way the military operates in orbit.The goal: to help the U.S. satellite constellation survive a sneak-attack by China or Russia. With hundreds of satellites in orbit, no single satellite is critically important, or so the thinking goes. If the Chinese or Russians were to knock out one or even dozens of satellites, scores more could take their place.But the new “mega-constellation” plan from the Space Development Agency might not actually work. The agency’s own director, Fred Kennedy, said it probably was “no panacea” against an enemy attack.It could be prohibitively expensive to deploy so many sats. Rocket launches are getting cheaper. But they might not yet be so cheap that the Pentagon could afford to conduct hundreds of them in a short span of time.In any event, the agency’s plan is advisory. The Pentagon could just ignore it. But the idea is interesting if no for other reason than its contrarianness. Today the U.S. military and other government agencies, universities and private companies together operate around 850 satellites, according to a count by the Massachusetts-based Union of Concerned Scientists. Second-place China has 280 satellites and Russia, in third place, has 150.But America’s satellites increasingly are vulnerable to attack, according to military officials. “China and Russia both are building direct-ascent weapons that can shoot down our satellites,” U.S. Air Force general John Hyten, the head of U.S. Strategic Command, said on Tuesday at the annual Space Symposium conference in Colorado Springs.“Direct-ascent weapon” is military parlance for “rocket.”That’s not all. Hyten also said Russia and China also are building lasers that can blind American spacecraft and jammers that cut the satellites’ links to controllers on the ground plus “on-orbit” weapons—in essence, kamikaze satellites that can ram into American sats.Not only are Moscow and Beijing building arsenals for taking down America’s space assets, they’re “doing it aggressively and quickly,” Hyten said.To be clear, the U.S. military has anti-satellite weapons of its own. And American sats aren’t exactly defenseless. Starting in 2018, the Air Force spent a billion dollars adding “resilience features” to some of its spacecraft. Resilience features might include better thrusters, allowing the spacecraft to maneuver more quickly in order to avoid attack. They may also include extra sensors on the spacecraft that act as a sort of orbital home-security system, monitoring the approach of potential assailants, according to James Oberg, an independent space expert and former NASA mission control specialist.“Now that autonomous mini-satellites can approach other satellites, sometimes without detection from the ground, space-based detection must be installed on the potential targets,” Oberg told me. The sensors could include cameras, radars, radio-signal detectors and “sniffers” that can track the energy from other satellites' thrusters, Oberg added.But the Space Development Agency, a small research organization that opened shop in March, wants to take a different approach. The Pentagon asked Congress for $ 150 million to fund the new agency through 2020.Rather than beefing up individual spacecraft, under the mega-constellation plan the military would simply buy lots more small, inexpensive satellites, reinforcing or replacing the roughly 170 large, expensive sats the armed forces currently operate.Speaking at the Colorado conference on Tuesday, Kennedy said he wants to see the Pentagon deploy “hundreds, perhaps even a thousand or more small satellites exhibiting a host of capabilities.”A graphic Kennedy displayed broke down the numbers of different kinds of spacecraft in the proposed mega-constellation. In all, 1,258 small satellites would crowd low orbit, scanning the Earth and space and relaying radio communications. Three copies of an “advanced maneuvering vehicle”—presumably some version of the Air Force’s secretive X-37B robotic mini-shuttle—would orbit above the other sats. Artificial intelligence would help ground-based controllers to maneuver and coordinate the hundreds of spacecraft, Kennedy said.But the plan hinges on very cheap space launches. Lots of them. In 2018, U.S. entities launched just 31, mostly big, satellites—many of which might remain in orbit a decade or longer. Since small satellites might last just a year or two, to build the mega-constellation the military could need to expand its launch activities by a factor of 20. It could be pricey. According to a 2018 paper by NASA researcher Harry Jones, the price per pound of a satellite launch has decreased from around $ 24,000 in the 1980s and 1990s to just $ 1,200 in 2019. But launching 600 or more satellites annually instead of 30 could more than offset the falling per-pound price of a launch.Kennedy acknowledged the downsides of his agency’s satellite plan. “We recognize that this isn’t the sum total of the nation's space construct,” he said. "We should not jump to extremes.”But even experimenting with a new approach to deploying satellites could result in better technology and methods that could make it harder for Russia or China to knock out America’s spacecraft, Kennedy said. “This puts us on a wonderfully disruptive path.”Kennedy said his agency would begin conducting conducting war games in order to test out the mega-constellation concept starting in 2022.Read more at The Daily Beast.



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