Seoul pleads with Putin to help 'tame' North Korea, as satellite images suggest nuclear test caused landslides

Seoul pleads with Putin to help 'tame' North Korea, as satellite images suggest nuclear test caused landslidesSouth Korea's president has asked Vladimir Putin to help tame North Korea, but the two leaders are divided over the need for sanctions on the rogue regime.  Speaking at Russia's Eastern Economic Forum, Moon Jae-in, the South Korean leader, said he and Mr Putin “share a view that North Korea has gone the wrong way with its nuclear and missile program”. He asked for assistance to “tame” the North, Yonhap news agency reported. Kim Jong-un provides guidance on a nuclear weapons program in this undated photo released by North Korea's Korean Central News Agency Credit: Reuters Before the talks, Mr Moon had warned that the situation could become “uncontrollable” if North Korea, which held its largest nuclear bomb test on Sunday, does not stop its “provocations”. Many expect more weapons tests this weekend. While Mr Moon has sought Russian support for stronger sanctions against North Korea, Mr Putin continued to insist that this is a dead end. Pyongyang city civilians celebrate the successful completion of the hydrostatic test for the intercontinental ballistic rocket installation in a photo released on Wednesday by North Korea's Korean Central News Agency Credit: Reuters He called Pyonyang's nuclear weapons programme a “crude violation of UN security council resolutions” but said it was “impossible to resolve the problem of the Korean peninsula only by sanctions and pressure”. “It's not worth giving in to emotions and driving North Korea into a corner,” Mr Putin said. “Now more than ever everyone needs to be cold-blooded and avoid steps leading to an escalation of tensions.” During their meeting, the South Korean leader said it was inevitable Pyongyang's oil supply would be cut and asked his Russian counterpart to cooperate, Mr Moon's press secretary said. Mr Putin responded that shutting off the pipeline would damage hospitals, his aide Yuri Ushakov said. Pyongyang city civilians celebrate the successful completion of the hydrostatic test for the intercontinental ballistic rocket installation in a photo released on Wednesday by North Korea's Korean Central News Agency Credit: Reuters Although China provides the bulk of North Korea's oil, Russia exports 40,000 tonnes of oil per quarter to the isolated state, Mr Putin said on Tuesday. But he called this “nothing” compared to its overall output and denied that the North Korean workers in Russia, who provide cash to the regime, were a problem. He added that the North Koreans “will eat grass but they won't give up (the nuclear) programme if they don't feel safe”. Mr Putin and Xi Jinping, the Chinese president, have instead pushed a “freeze for freeze” plan that would see the United States and South Korea stop large military exercises in exchange for North Korea ceasing weapons tests. Jerry Brown, the governor of California, also spoke at the forum, calling on Russia, China, Japan and the United States to fight climate change. Mr Brown promised to help Russian students with visas after Washington closed Russia's San Francisco consulate this weekend. Before-and-after images show the Punggye-ri test site where on September 3, 2017, North Korea claimed to have conducted the undeground explosion of a hydrogen bomb Credit: AFP Meanwhile, analysts said landslides had been triggered around the site of North Korea's nuclear test due to the powerful 6.3-magnitude tremor. The first satellite images of the site show a series of disturbances in the land, according to the 38 North website, which is linked to Johns Hopkins University in the United States. China’s Earthquake Network Centre said a second 4.6 magnitude “earthquake tremor” after Sunday’s initial explosion could be the result of a “cave-in,” although the 38 North report did not find evidence of a collapse crater.



Yahoo News – Latest News & Headlines