Egypt archaeologists unearth 3,500-year-old tomb in Luxor

Egypt archaeologists unearth 3,500-year-old tomb in LuxorEgyptian archaeologists have uncovered the tomb of a goldsmith dedicated to the god Amun and the mummies of a woman and her two children, the antiquities ministry said on Saturday. The finds, dating back to the New Kingdom (16th to 11th centuries BC), were made in the Draa Abul Naga necropolis on the west bank of the Nile in Luxor, famed for its temples and burial grounds. The tomb of "Amun's Goldsmith, Amenemhat" contained a sculpture carved into a recess of him seated beside his wife, the ministry said. An Egyptian antiquities worker in the recently discovered tomb of Amenemhat Credit: Mohamed Abd El Ghany/Reuters A portrait of their son was painted between them. A burial shaft in the tomb led to a chamber where the archaeologists discovered mummies, funerary statues and masks, the ministry said. Another shaft led to a chamber where the team found the mummies of a woman and two children. An Egyptian archaeologist looks at a newly-uncovered sarcophagus in the Draa Abul Naga necropolis Credit: Egyptian Ministry of Antiquities via AFP  The woman appears to have died at the age of 50 and tests showed she had suffered from a bacterial bone disease, the ministry quoted bone specialist Sherine Ahmed Shawqi as saying. The team also discovered 150 small funerary statues carved in wood, clay and limestone. A skull and a foot are seen in the recently discovered tomb of Amenemhat Credit: Mohamed Abd El Ghany/Reuters The tomb, located on the west bank of the river Nile in a cemetery for noblemen and top officials, is a relatively modest discovery, but one that authorities has announced with a great deal of fanfare in a bid to boost the country's slowly recovering tourism industry. "We want tomorrow's newspapers to speak about Egypt and make people want to come to Egypt," antiquities minister Khaled el-Anani told reporters. Egyptian archaeologist restoring a wooden sarcophagus at a newly-uncovered ancient tomb for a goldsmith in Luxor Credit: KHALED DESOUKI/AFP/Getty Images The tomb was discovered by Egyptian archeologists, something that a senior official at the antiquities ministry hailed as evidence of their growing professionalism and expertise. "We used to escort foreign archeologists as observers, but that's now in the past. We are the leaders now," said Mustafa Waziri, Luxor's chief archaeologist. 



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